TOP TEN WAYS OF TALKING ABOUT YOUR ART IN THE APOCALYPSE

drone6 by canekzapata

10. In this apocalyptic climate, art is still relevant
9. In this apocalyptic climate, MY art is still relevant
8. Perhaps all art can be described as “apocalyptic”
7. If you don’t come to my opening, the apocalypse wins
6. Ever since I was a postgraduate I have been fascinated by the apocalypse. What starts out as mildly-apocalyptic soon becomes a total apocalypse, leaving only a sense that something apocalyptic has happened
5. Not all artists are apocalyptically-minded, and they shouldn’t be
4. Not all artists are apocalyptically-minded, but they should be
3. My work explores the relationship between me and the apocalypse. With influences as diverse as the apocalypse and me, new synergies are distilled.
2. In the aftermath of the apocalypse, the role of the artist is not to ignore the apocalypse
1. Well it might be the apocalypse but I’m still taking myself very seriously

The Art of Politics, and Vice-Versa.

two truths and a lie by maywaver

Late night television in America is a rite of passage for our most beloved musicians, from Elvis Presley on The Ed Sullivan Show to Lil Wayne on Jay Leno. In recent years, the SNL appearances of both Kanye West and Drake, black creatives renowned for their social media savvy, have been utilized to maximize hype and album success in the post-digital age.

Late night musical performances represent everything good cross-branding promotion aims to do. It brings an artist’s core fans to an institution and brings artists wider exposure to more mainstream audiences, a way to connect with the abstracted “middle america” between NYC and L.A. This wider exposure is usually much more beneficial to the artist than the fans they bring to the institution (although those advertising checks still cha-ching at the bank), but this is offset by the cultural cachet the artist brings the institution, essentially checking a box that says “we’re still cool, with it, and keeping our fingers on America’s pulse.”

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Tyler Kline’s 5T4RG$T3 at Fringe Art Fest


5T4RG$T3 by Tyler Kline

The Fringe Art Fest in Philadelphia went live today, and Tyler Kline’s 5T4RG$T3 is featured as part of digital fringe and will be shown at Crux Space.

Kline uses the NewHive ST4RG$T3 as a portal linking various NewHive pages tagged #bravostarkweather together. In an experiment to create a fictional character, each page is a different aspect of his/her journey from birth to post-humanism to intergalactic voyaging. This character will realize an instantiation in January at the Esther Klein Gallery in Philadelphia, where Kline will use this project as an abstract to flesh out the artifacts of this speculative experiment.


|_4|\||>5|-|4|=T | | by Tyler Kline

“Part of this project is a meditation on the non-binary nature of biological intelligence vs the binary algorithm controlled nature of AI,” says Kline. “I have been reading Ray Kurtzweil and Jaron Lanier, one an optimist cheerleader of silicon ascendancy and the other a critic. What I think they both don’t see regarding the coming singularity is that A.I. will never think like a biological human brain, it will never overtake us that way. What is happening, and what the real singularity entails, is that humans are beginning to think like their binary devices, we are culturally and psychologically being colonized by artificial intelligence. At some point this will become native. It is already legislated, our current police state designed for a post-human society. The singularity will be a complete binary colonization of the native biological mind.”